Valencia calling

Hello! I am back in the castle- well not exactly, but I am surrounded by one foot thick, uninsulated concrete walls and our downstairs entrance has got iron bars to protect us. At the moment, we have moved into our new temporary residence in Cheste - a small, slightly repressed village in the suburbs of Valencia, Spain.

So, “Hola, amigos! 

This city has a lot of medieval styled buildings and streets so narrow that our twin-baby stroller cannot fit onto the sidewalks, with the exception of the new part of the town designed for two-way traffic and  for the modern citizens of the world.

Our little “castle” on Calle Laurel has got three bedrooms, one master bedroom, one for children and one in the other end  of the apartment for “a grandparent”- although that room is just full of luggage now. We have got stone floors and granite kitchen table tops with two large marble sinks - the bigger sink works well as children’s bath tub. Now we should learn install our own gas bottle to heat the water, so we don’t need to shower with cold water or  heat up  bath-time water in casseroles for our children... I would say, we have adjusted rather well to the Spanish sunshine and mañana. We`ve even rented a blue little Nissan, just big enough to fit our cube, aerial hoop, silks, costumes, the twin baby stroller and two kids in the back, so we can freely commute to the shows and back in and around of Valencia.

Coming from the cold north where open air shows are scarce, it is mind-opening to see that here in Spain, a three-month long tour can be performed at an outside stage just on the city plazas. What a great way to spend an evening  with your extended family in the fresh air, watching beautiful dancing, singing and circus entertainment.

What about Prince Leo and Princess Snowberry? They are with us, of course, incredible adjusting to this new life in Spain. During our very late shows (which means the show can start anytime between 23 or 01 hours...), they sit in the twin baby cart in our dressing room  tent, snacking with fresh pineapple pieces and croissants, watching cartoons from our portable multimedia player. Even though, they do take up a lot of our concentration, I am ever so proud of them and their ability to adjust.

It is difficult to get good nannies, especially in new places. How can I trust to leave my children with strangers in a new place? If the company who invites does not support the search of a nanny, we will most likely take the children to work with us. My mind is at ease when I know that they are waiting for us in the dressing room. At least here in Spain, so far all the Spanish people and Spanish companies we have worked with are family friendly. This is not evident in many other countries, i.e Germany. One point to Spain! 

Of course, we try to respect customs of each place we work for, but as a mother, I do prefer to have the liberty and choice to take my children to work if needed. Many of my artists colleagues also have gone through similar faces during their career, children sleeping in the props boxes during the show or they need to set up a time-watch to prepare for the show in order to be able to take care of the kids and work all together. 

Perhaps, it is hard to see how children and work can be combined, but the impossible is possible if one really wants - and needs it too. Besides, our children are such a blessing.

Our “rubio” Prince Leo has charmed everyone here with his ice-blue eyes and wide smile and getting even a kiss from a little Spanish angelica, and  Princess Snowberry goes to an English-Spanish daycare group and has already learned to count in Spanish. Uno, dos, tres, cuatro!

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© Circus Princess 2014